The Queen Elizabeth Scholarship Trust (QEST) funds the education of talented craftspeople through traditional college courses, apprenticeships or one-on-one training with masters.

QEST was established to help support artisans of all ages, from all backgrounds and, at a critical stage in their careers and thus sustain traditional British craftsmanship.

The charitable arm of the Royal Warrant Holders Association, QEST was established in 1990 to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the Association and the 90th birthday of Queen Elizabeth, The Queen Mother. Since 1990 the Trust has awarded over £2.5 million to 354 craftspeople aged between 17 and 50+ for study, training and work experience.







To become a QEST scholar or apprentice


To be accepted as a scholar or apprentice of QEST is much more than receiving financial support for your training.

It means being welcomed into a unique family of craft, where the alumni of twenty-five years are as interested in the work that you have achieved as indeed the holders of Royal Warrants of Appointment.

If your application captures the attention of the QEST Trustees and Skills Advisors, you will be invited to attend an interview, where you will be given the opportunity to show samples of your work, highlight what you would like to achieve should you be given the opportunity of funding and generally display a passion for your chosen craft. Scholars will have already been practising and therefore be able to demonstrate a level of skill. Apprentices will need the advocacy of their proposed employer or master.




LATEST NEWS

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  • Scholar Blog #1 Alan Moore

    December 13, 2014

    The Beginning of the Journey – My QEST So Far
    by Alan Moore

     

    I first heard about the Queen Elizabeth Scholarship Trust whilst looking for funding to study at the prestigious Royal School of Needlework.


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  • Enthusiastic response to Education Manifesto

    December 3, 2014

    The value of the crafts industry to the British economy was measured using research commissioned after the government’s Department of Culture, Media and Sport proposed dropping crafts from its list of recognised creative industries in 2013.


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  • Fashion inspired by fishing flies

    December 1, 2014

    After showing at Holland & Holland last winter, Lai Symes has been inspired by the country theme.  The hat shown is made from charcoal faux-fur with woodcock feathers from her father-in-law’s farm in Suffolk and embroidered with a silver beaded spray reminiscent of gun shot and finished with raspberry colour shell-stitched lining.


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  • All bagged up for NYC

    December 1, 2014

    Distance is no barrier when making bespoke:  Leather maker, Mark Gizzi’s first sale from his Etsy site left his Hertfordshire studio and was delivered by UPS to legal offices in Manhattan in just over 24-hours.


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  • From The Tate to Oslo

    December 1, 2014

    Laura Homer has been appointed Paintings Conservator at the National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design in Oslo.  She is one of a team of three paintings conservators looking after a collection of approximately 7500 paintings spread across the National Gallery and the Museum of Contemporary Art.


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  • Worker bees brought to the City

    July 30, 2014

    James Hamill, Master Beekeeper for The Hive Honey Shop was Country Life magazine’s beekeeping spokesperson during their first London fair at Fulham Palace in September.  The event celebrated the best of British Countryside-in-Town. “I was delighted to speak about the plight of the honeybee at the Country Life Fair.


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SUPPORT QEST


See ‘Supporting QEST’ for more information on how to support us.

Any donation, or any percentage of a residuary estate, makes a very real difference to QEST. We remain truly grateful to our loyal supporters and to the Royal Warrant holders who had the vision to establish QEST and have supported 354 inspirational artisans achieve their full potential.




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